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How Jerry Lorenzo Is Changing the Way People See Basketball Sneakers

We didn’t include the Air Fear of God 1 in our preview of  this season’s NBA sneaker storylines  through no fault of our own. At the time, hints and rumors stated Fear of God founder Jerry Lorenzo had a project in the works with Nike. Now, we’re only days away from the footwear and apparel collection’s release. The actual footwear already looks  tremendous enough to earn a spot on  our list of the year’s best collabs . But what’s bigger than that is the large statement it makes: the world’s of streetwear and performance basketball footwear have now fully converged.
 The NBA’s style renaissance has been blossoming for several years. It’s been aided in part by the impact of social media and, more importantly, the players taking a bigger interest fashion as a form of expression. Players have become icons again after trailing behind music artists and social media influencers for the better part of the past two decades. Their outfits get dissected on social media and discussed on TV on a regular basis. Their shoe choices, both on and off the court, carry discussion nearly as much as their actual play.
 Their move towards making sized sartorial choices coincides with streetwear’s rise in influence. Brands once reserved for those in the know now help make up the mainstream. Louis Vuitton leveraged cool by linking with Supreme. Legacy brands like Polo work with Palace. It’s no surprise the NBA, easily the most current of the major league sports, would see the effects of this blurring of the lines and blending of styles in 2018.  POST CONTINUES BELOW  P.J. Tucker wearing the Nike Air Fear of God 1 in an NBA game. Image via Nathaniel S. Butler for  Getty Images
 The league could have arrived here sooner if  Kanye West had his way years ago . The rapper-turned-designer wanted to put Yeezys on the hardwood during his time with Nike, but the idea never came to fruition. His departure from the company to competing brand Adidas, along with the rise of “athleisure,” happened as basketball footwear prices started rise while interest and sales in performance footwear subsequently waned.
 With Adid
How Jerry Lorenzo Is Changing the Way People See Basketball Sneakers We didn’t include the Air Fear of God 1 in our preview of this season’s NBA sneaker storylines through no fault of our own. At the time, hints and rumors stated Fear of God founder Jerry Lorenzo had a project in the works with Nike. Now, we’re only days away from the footwear and apparel collection’s release. The actual footwear already looks  tremendous enough to earn a spot on our list of the year’s best collabs . But what’s bigger than that is the large statement it makes: the world’s of streetwear and performance basketball footwear have now fully converged. The NBA’s style renaissance has been blossoming for several years. It’s been aided in part by the impact of social media and, more importantly, the players taking a bigger interest fashion as a form of expression. Players have become icons again after trailing behind music artists and social media influencers for the better part of the past two decades. Their outfits get dissected on social media and discussed on TV on a regular basis. Their shoe choices, both on and off the court, carry discussion nearly as much as their actual play. Their move towards making sized sartorial choices coincides with streetwear’s rise in influence. Brands once reserved for those in the know now help make up the mainstream. Louis Vuitton leveraged cool by linking with Supreme. Legacy brands like Polo work with Palace. It’s no surprise the NBA, easily the most current of the major league sports, would see the effects of this blurring of the lines and blending of styles in 2018. POST CONTINUES BELOW P.J. Tucker wearing the Nike Air Fear of God 1 in an NBA game. Image via Nathaniel S. Butler for Getty Images The league could have arrived here sooner if Kanye West had his way years ago . The rapper-turned-designer wanted to put Yeezys on the hardwood during his time with Nike, but the idea never came to fruition. His departure from the company to competing brand Adidas, along with the rise of “athleisure,” happened as basketball footwear prices started rise while interest and sales in performance footwear subsequently waned. With Adid